Welcome

You are invited to blog on Bell Ladies, a blog for women who share a love for literature, music, cooking, health & fitness, and anything pretty. Share your good news, store & sales, creativity, and feelings. If you'd like to blog with us, send an E-mail to bell.ladies@gmail.com . Include your full name and how you found our blog. We are excited to blog with you!

Monday

Saving the World's Women

I like to dabble in digital scrap booking. One of my favorite resources for digital scrap booking is a website called The Daily Digi. There is wonderful information there, along with plenty of inspiration & helps. Every Sunday the authors post something that has nothing to do with digital scrap booking, but is interesting. This past Sunday they posted an article about saving the world's women. You can read it here. Be forewarned, if you are having a sad or otherwise emotional day, save it for later. It's very sad. But it is also full of hope. It is also rather long, but it's such a good article. Here's a preview:

"After we married in 1988, we moved to Beijing to be correspondents for The New York Times. Seven months later we found ourselves standing on the edge of Tiananmen Square watching troops fire their automatic weapons at prodemocracy protesters. The massacre claimed between 400 and 800 lives and transfixed the world; wrenching images of the killings appeared constantly on the front page and on television screens.

Yet the following year we came across an obscure but meticulous demographic study that outlined a human rights violation that had claimed tens of thousands more lives. This study found that 39,000 baby girls died annually in China because parents didn’t give them the same medical care and attention that boys received — and that was just in the first year of life. A result is that as many infant girls died unnecessarily every week in China as protesters died at Tiananmen Square. Those Chinese girls never received a column inch of news coverage, and we began to wonder if our journalistic priorities were skewed.

A similar pattern emerged in other countries. In India, a “bride burning” takes place approximately once every two hours, to punish a woman for an inadequate dowry or to eliminate her so a man can remarry — but these rarely constitute news. When a prominent dissident was arrested in China, we would write a front-page article; when 100,000 girls were kidnapped and trafficked into brothels, we didn’t even consider it news.

Amartya Sen, the ebullient Nobel Prize-winning economist, developed a gauge of gender inequality that is a striking reminder of the stakes involved. “More than 100 million women are missing,” Sen wrote in a classic essay in 1990 in The New York Review of Books, spurring a new field of research. Sen noted that in normal circumstances, women live longer than men, and so there are more females than males in much of the world. Yet in places where girls have a deeply unequal status, they vanish. China has 107 males for every 100 females in its overall population (and an even greater disproportion among newborns), and India has 108. The implication of the sex ratios, Sen later found, is that about 107 million females are missing from the globe today. Follow-up studies have calculated the number slightly differently, deriving alternative figures for “missing women” of between 60 million and 107 million."

1 comment:

Youngbergs said...

I am just getting started in digital scrap booking. Thanks for the website tip!